Resources Tagged With: college transition

Handling College Admission Decisions: A Sidecar Parent’s Guide

Helicopter, bulldozer, snowplow, tugboat, Velcro, tiger, and now drone—these are all the deprecatory labels that we use to describe today’s overinvolved, and sometimes aggressive, parents. Throughout two decades as a school counselor, I have witnessed these child-rearing styles and many others. I am not a fan of such pejorative terms, as the reality is, parents love their children. It is this love, and the hopes and fears it ignites, that drive parents’ actions. Read more ›

Hurtful Emotions: Understanding Self-Harm

People deal with difficult feelings in all sorts of ways. They may talk with friends, go work out, or listen to music. But some people may feel an urge to hurt themselves when distressed. Read more ›

How Latinos Are Bonding Over First-Generation Trauma

Leslie Gonzalez’s path to becoming a doctor was filled with overwhelming pressure, stress and anxiety. Classroom struggles, the challenge of juggling a part-time job and schoolwork — Gonzalez labeled herself a failure. And on top of that, she felt the pressure of being one of the only Latinas in her medical school setting. Read more ›

Book: The Parent Compass

Many parents don’t know how best to support their teens, especially when everyone around them seems to be frantically tutoring, managing, and helicoptering. The Parent Compass provides guidance on what parents’ roles should be in supporting their teens’ mental health as they traverse the maze of the adolescent years. Read more ›

To College or Not to College?

How do you even start the college conversation without your child shutting down or storming off? In this Voices of Compassion episode, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Katie Reeves, shares communication strategies for launching meaningful discussions with your teens about college, COVID, mental health, and more. Read more ›

Going to College With a Mental Health Disorder [web resource]

In many ways, college offers a “blank slate” and is the perfect time and place to reinvent yourself. Between the independent living, opportunities to pursue your own interests, new people to meet, and different social scenes to become a part of, it may feel like you can leave your pre-college self behind and start over.

Despite these many ways to reinvent yourself, if you are living with a mental health disorder it’s important to remember that your condition still exists and can’t be ignored or erased as you work on establishing your “new” self. Read more ›

Starting the Conversation: College and Your Mental Health [downloadable] [video]

To help put a thoughtful plan into place should a mental health condition arise, the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) and The Jed Foundation have created a guide to help start the conversation. It offers both parents and students the opportunity to learn more about mental health, including what the privacy laws are and how mental health information can be shared. Read more ›

A Parent’s Guide to Mental Health for College Students

While the college years have always been a time when mental health problems can emerge, the problems have escalated according to data from the American College Health Association (ACHA) survey. What actions can parents take in the face of rising mental health problems? Read more ›

Managing a Mental Health Condition in College

College means new freedoms and new opportunities. Making the transition to college isn’t easy for anyone. Classes will be more difficult than high school and you have to plan ahead and motivate yourself to study. Plus you may have the new and stressful experience of living with a randomly-assigned roommate. All these things can impact your mental health. To make sure you succeed in college, know where to find support and how to put your best foot forward. Read more ›

Having Second Thoughts About Sending Your Child Off to College in These Difficult Times?

The deposit is in, and your family has made the best decision possible about what school to attend in the fall, given the pandemic.

But as the days have passed, you’ve started to wonder if it was the right decision. Or perhaps your child is returning to college or considering a school for 2021, and the location is giving you pause.

Do any of these scenarios sound familiar? You’re not alone.  Parents all over the country are wondering the same thing. Read more ›

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