Resources Tagged With: IEP

Assessment 101: An Inside Look at Evaluations

We receive lots of questions from parents about evaluations: Does my child need one? Or should we just start treatment? An evaluation by a psychologist or a multidisciplinary team can be a valuable tool in understanding your child’s strengths and weaknesses and provide a roadmap for next steps. It can reveal whether what seems like distraction, laziness or reluctance could actually be a sign of mental health or learning challenges. Read more ›

Understanding Your Child’s Psychoeducational Evaluation Report [video]

Has your child has been formally assessed for learning disabilities and or ADHD, by either a psychoeducational or neuropsychological evaluation? If so, understanding the report is critical to your ability to become the best advocate for their needs. Read more ›

The School Evaluation Process: How to Get Formal Assessments and Appropriate Services

Is your child eligible for a school evaluation for ADHD or a learning disability? If they are struggling with learning, behavior, or academic skills, the answer is probably Yes. Here, understand how to get your child a meaningful evaluation, the important first step to securing the school services and supports your child requires. Read more ›

Questions to Ask Specialists Who Evaluate for Learning Disabilities

Hiring a private specialist to conduct a psychoeducational evaluation of your child is a big commitment of time, effort, and money. To find someone competent, ask other parents or school staff for their recommendations. You’ll probably want to interview more than one specialist before choosing the person who will work with your child. Read more ›

Private vs. School Evaluations: Pros and Cons

You’ve decided to have your child evaluated. The next question is: How? You can request that the school do the testing , or you can hire a private evaluator . Each option has benefits and drawbacks. Which one is best depends on your and your child’s needs and preferences. Here are the pros and cons of each. Read more ›

7 Things to Know About College Disability Services

If your child has had an IEP or a 504 plan in high school, you’ve been able to play a role in the process. You’ve had access to the people who are providing supports and services. And you’ve been able to monitor how well those supports are being implemented. Read more ›

What Lessons Does Special Education Hold for Improving Personalized Learning?

Personalized learning has, in recent years, become one of the most talked-about trends in education. Fueled by donations from Silicon Valley philanthropists, the instructional approach has spread to classrooms around the country and more than 40 states are exploring it in some form. Read more ›

Managing a Mental Health Condition in College

College means new freedoms and new opportunities. Making the transition to college isn’t easy for anyone. Classes will be more difficult than high school and you have to plan ahead and motivate yourself to study. Plus you may have the new and stressful experience of living with a randomly-assigned roommate. All these things can impact your mental health. To make sure you succeed in college, know where to find support and how to put your best foot forward. Read more ›

6 Ways to Teach SEL Skills Remotely

This year, schools may be offering social-emotional skills training to students with disabilities, such as autism, in separate virtual groups. However, if staff are spread thin, or students need additional opportunities to generalize skills, it may be useful to find ways to integrate social-emotional learning into other virtual encounters during the day. This will help to ensure students who have social-emotional goals in their IEPs can work on their skills. Read more ›

Educators: What Steps Should You Take With Evaluation Requests During COVID?

As students return to in-person instruction, their parents may be concerned about the repercussions of the pandemic on their child’s learning. They may raise those concerns with their child’s pediatrician or other medical provider and arrive at your district with a prescription for an evaluation, specific services, or an IEP from the doctor. Read more ›

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