Emergency Phone Numbers24-hr Crisis Lines: 855.278.4204 (Santa Clara) | 650.579.0350 (San Mateo) | 415.781.0500 (San Francisco) | 800.273.8255 or Text BAY to 741-741 (National)

Parenting

Teens Ask, NPR Anwers: What’s Up With COVID Vaccines?

People between the ages of 12 and 17 are now eligible to get the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine and health officials expect this age group will soon be able to receive the Moderna one. NPR health reporter Pien Huang and Short Wave producer Rebecca Ramirez talked to teens about their questions about the vaccine and what a strange year the pandemic has been for them. Read more ›

Autism Spectrum Disorder: Engaging in a Social World

Being social and making friends isn’t always easy. Relationships have many subtleties. But people with autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, struggle more than most. For them, communicating with others can be very difficult. Read more ›

For Toddlers, Pandemic Shapes Development During Formative Years

Lucretia Wilks, who runs a small day care out of her home in north St. Louis County, is used to watching young children embrace, hold hands and play together in close quarters.

But the covid-19 pandemic made such normal toddler behavior potentially unsafe. Read more ›

PBS: Talking to Young Children About Race and Racism [video]

Children are never too young to learn about diversity. As young as 3 months old, they may look differently at people who look like or don’t look like their primary caregivers. As parents and caregivers, we must have confidence in ourselves and in our children — that we, and they, can handle tough topics and tough situations. We must understand that our role is to be honest, specific, and trustworthy as we raise the next generation to confront racial injustice. Read more ›

How to Talk to Kids about Race [video]

In this video, HuffPost Life reporter Caroline Bologna shares an age-by-age guide for discussing race with your children. Read more ›

Coming Out of Our COVID Caves: An Expert’s Guide to Re-Entry

 

For the past 15 months, we’ve been carefully following safety protocols, and strict mandates have helped inform our decisions. Now, as we come out of our COVID caves, the rules are more ambiguous and varying comfort levels collide. It can create a whole new wave of anxiety around what feels safe, especially when our precautions don’t match those around us.

In this Voices of Compassion podcast, CHC’s Dr. Vivien Keil, shares coping strategies for easing our family’s way back into the world with courage and compassion. Read more ›

The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind

In The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind Daniel J. Siegel, neuropsychiatrist and author of the bestselling Mindsight, and parenting expert Tina Payne Bryson offer a revolutionary approach to child rearing with twelve key strategies that foster healthy brain development, leading to calmer, happier children. Read more ›

Talking to Your Kids About Life After the Pandemic

If you are a parent, the period of self-isolation due to the COVID-19 pandemic may have been a difficult adjustment for your children. Similarly, the idea of going back into the world might leave your kids feeling anxious at the idea of another big change, or they could be looking forward to things going back to “normal” only to find that life still isn’t quite as they remember it.

It’s important to talk to your children about how what to expect as they re-enter the world outside of your home. Read more ›

Strengthening Families and the Protective Factors Framework [downloadable]

At its heart, Strengthening Families is about how families are supported to build key protective factors that enable children to thrive. The five protective factors at the foundation of Strengthening Families also offer a framework for changes at the systems, policy and practice level – locally, statewide and nationally. Read more ›

Parenting: A Better Normal

Nothing about the past year has been easy for parents. They’ve lost loved ones, lost jobs. They’ve been cut off from their children’s grandparents, cut off from child care, cut off from friends and support systems. They’ve missed out on graduations and bar mitzvahs, proms and vacations. They’ve juggled remote school and remote jobs, or been forced to put themselves and their families at risk by continuing to leave the house for jobs that must be done in person. Read more ›

1 2 3 63