Healthy Development

Parents Who Raise Resilient, Socially Intelligent Kids Do These 5 Things

Kids, especially teens and tweens, sometimes need validation that what they are thinking and feeling is normal and okay. In fact, psychologists believe that validation is one of the most powerful parenting tools, and yet it is often left out of traditional behavioral parent training programs. Read more ›

10 Tips for Building Resilience in Children and Teens

We tend to idealize childhood as a carefree time, but youth alone offers no shield against the emotional hurts, challenges, and traumas many children face. Children can be asked to deal with problems ranging from adapting to a new classroom or online schooling to bullying by peers or even struggles at home. Add to that the uncertainties that are part of growing up in a complex world, and childhood can be anything but carefree. The ability to thrive despite these challenges arises from the skills of resilience. Read more ›

The Teen Brain: What Are They Thinking?

Our brains develop from the back to the front. The prefrontal cortex — important for impulse control, managing emotions, planning, organization and finishing tasks — is the last to develop, and is not fully mature until our mid-twenties. How does this impact teen behavior and decision making and how can parents make sure we still matter? Read more ›

Affirming, Gender-Expansive Children’s Books

When is the right time to talk to children about gender identity and gender expression?  Children internalize messages about gender from a very young age, so it’s never too early to start.

If you’re feeling unsure about how navigate these conversations, you’re not alone. One way to begin to explore the topic is through books. Read more ›

How Does The Teenage Brain Make Decisions?

Teenagers often make risky choices that appear absurd in the eyes of their parents. But neuroscientist Adriana Galván says these decisions are critical for adolescent brain development.
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The Adolescent Brain [video]

Perhaps you’ve heard that adolescent behavior is governed by “raging hormones,” or that adolescents are impulsive because they are “immature.” Neither of those are accurate. What is actually on is the remodeling in the brain.  In this engaging 4-minute video, clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine Dan Siegel, M.D., dispels myths about the adolescent brain. Read more ›

Teen Brain: Behavior, Problem Solving, and Decision Making

Many parents do not understand why their teenagers occasionally behave in an impulsive, irrational, or dangerous way. At times, it seems like teens don’t think things through or fully consider the consequences of their actions. Adolescents differ from adults in the way they behave, solve problems, and make decisions. Read more ›

Why Parents Shouldn’t Use Food as Reward or Punishment

Using food as a reward or as a punishment can undermine the healthy eating habits that you’re trying to teach your children. Giving sweets, chips, or soda as a reward often leads to children overeating foods that are high in sugar, fat, and empty calories. Worse, it interferes with kids’ natural ability to regulate their eating. It also encourages them to eat when they’re not hungry to reward themselves.
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Assessment 101: An Inside Look at Evaluations

We receive lots of questions from parents about evaluations: Does my child need one? Or should we just start treatment? An evaluation by a psychologist or a multidisciplinary team can be a valuable tool in understanding your child’s strengths and weaknesses and provide a roadmap for next steps. It can reveal whether what seems like distraction, laziness or reluctance could actually be a sign of mental health or learning challenges. Read more ›

Language Delays in Young Children

A lack of socialization over the past two years has a lot of parents worried about their children’s language development. In fact, one of the most viewed articles in our online Resource Library right now focuses on speech delays in young children during COVID. How do we know when our kids should be progressing from first words to full sentences? Have masks and social distancing affected typical language development? Where should we turn if we’re concerned? Read more ›

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