College

Colleges Struggle to Recruit Therapists for Students in Crisis

Early in his first quarter at the University of California-Davis, Ryan Manriquez realized he needed help. A combination of pressures — avoiding covid-19, enduring a breakup, dealing with a disability, trying to keep up with a tough slate of classes — hit him hard. Read more ›

Handling College Admission Decisions: A Sidecar Parent’s Guide

Helicopter, bulldozer, snowplow, tugboat, Velcro, tiger, and now drone—these are all the deprecatory labels that we use to describe today’s overinvolved, and sometimes aggressive, parents. Throughout two decades as a school counselor, I have witnessed these child-rearing styles and many others. I am not a fan of such pejorative terms, as the reality is, parents love their children. It is this love, and the hopes and fears it ignites, that drive parents’ actions. Read more ›

Executive Functioning Modules for College Students [downloadable]

Almost all students struggle at one time or another with focus, paying attention, organizing, prioritizing, and completing projects or papers. These modules from the University of Wisconsin–Madison will focus on increasing self-awareness and improving your ability to pay attention and focus, which are related to the skills of executive functioning. Read more ›

Hurtful Emotions: Understanding Self-Harm

People deal with difficult feelings in all sorts of ways. They may talk with friends, go work out, or listen to music. But some people may feel an urge to hurt themselves when distressed. Read more ›

Colleges Are Turning to Science to Limit Suicide Contagion and Help Heal Campuses

Just as there’s research on how to prevent mental health crises and interventions for people who are actively suicidal, research is also developing around the effective steps that can be taken after a suicide to help communities grieve, restore a sense of stability and limit the risk of more deaths. Read more ›

Schwab Learning Center at CHC

7 Things to Know About College Disability Services

If your child has had an IEP or a 504 plan in high school, you’ve been able to play a role in the process. You’ve had access to the people who are providing supports and services. And you’ve been able to monitor how well those supports are being implemented. Read more ›

Colleges & Careers: Deciding to Opt In or Out of High-Stakes Tests

For prospective students and professionals who want to pursue certain degrees and careers, high-stakes tests will often be necessary.

For those with a learning disability or another disability, testing accommodations are available. Accommodations that can be requested often include distraction-free rooms, extra time, assistive readers, use of a calculator, and more. The use of accommodations is kept confidential, so colleges and employers will not know if someone has a learning disability or used testing accommodations unless the individual discloses it. Read more ›

College Students with ADHD

Most people with ADHD are diagnosed before college. However, some people may not recognize the signs and symptoms of ADHD until they are at college. Trying to balance school work and the freedom of living away from home for the first time may be challenging. Read more ›

Succeeding in College with ADHD [video]

Heading off to college and wondering how you’ll cope with your ADHD symptoms? First, know that you are not alone. Plenty of people who have ADHD or its symptoms have succeeded in college. That includes learning how to deal with issues of time management, emotional and social well-being, focusing in class, doing homework, and taking tests. Read more ›

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